sycan-logo-web

Geek Heresy and EarthGames

I’ve recently started reading a fantastic book on a friend’s recommendation called Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology. The book takes a look at the culture of technology in human society, with the premise of delving into how technology came to be so highly-regarded as a tool for social change and why this view can be problematic. I’m only one chapter in, but Geek Heresy has already got me thinking about what is likely a central theme: technology does little for social change without the right people to support the change.

Over the weekend, I helped represent EarthGames UW at the second annual Seattle Youth Climate Action Network (Seattle Youth CAN) Summit. During the lunch hour, we let the eager high-schoolers explore some of the games that EarthGames designed over the past year. We followed this up with an activity-packed hour where we guided a dozen students in developing a concept for their very own environmental game!

The event ended up being the highlight of my weekend. I met a young woman who had already designed her own game about pollution using HTML/Javascript, and within the hour-long game jam, we already had a game concept down (tower defense style game about overfishing)! I got to meet a bunch of really smart kids that were excited to bring about environmental change.

Now, you might be wondering why these two pieces are in the same blog post. Throughout the event, I kept thinking back to Geek Heresy and how these games are like the teaching tools presented at the beginning of the book. While EarthGames UW was founded on the motivation to teach people about climate change and the environment, the games that we make are just as likely to see the same downfalls as the laptops-in-the-wall presented in Geek Heresy’s first chapter — a lack of mentoring or guidance means less effective or a complete lack of social change.

I’m glad that EarthGames is taking on more opportunities to engage with youth with games and game design. There’s a lot of potential in using games to engage with the public, and even more in using game design to let the public engage with us and each other. I hope EarthGames will continue to foster collaborations with engagement groups to enable change in our society. If I get the chance (and time!), I hope to be able to foster these collaborations myself.

What do you think is essential for social change? How do you go about engaging your community? Let me know in the comments section!

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s